Current Projects




X
... home
   
 

Exploring how sight and sound interact
We know from everyday experience that what we see affects what we hear and vice versa. Although this sensory interaction occurs most strongly for speech, we investigate whether they occur for simple and speech-like tones, and whether visual information can facilitate speech perception in noisy conditions. We use a combination of psychophysics, Fourier analysis, functional imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in this project. Partly funded by the Wellcome Trust.

Collaborators
Mark Laing, Newcastle University (PhD student)
Jehill Parikh, Newcastle University
Andrew Blamire, Newcastle University
Adrian Rees, Newcastle University

   
  Haptic vision
We are interested in how the sense of touch (haptics) can interact with vision, particularly to help those with low vision (e.g., macular degeneration). To address this, we are using emerging technologies to simulate tactile "textures" (e.g., the roughness of a tree bark) on touch screens. These technologies are also potential low-cost solutions for emerging cultures so we will conduct parallel studies in the UK and in Egypt. Funded by the British Council.

Collaborators
Patrick Degenaar, Newcastle University
Walid Al-atabany, Helwan University
Greg Topel, TANVAS
   
  Cognitve modulation of pain
Pain is a salient percept that can draw our attention away from our current task so we can deal with potential bodily harm. We are interested in how our thoughts and actions can help us deal with pain, for example by distracting us from a painful stimulus. To address this, we have been using cognitively-demanding visual tasks to measure how cognition reduces the pain intensity people feel in response to a painful stimulus.

Collaborators
Vera Araujo-Soares, Newcastle University
Angela Owen, Newcastle University
X
 

Neural changes with perceptual expertise
Neural changes can occur as people acquire expertise with a category of objects (e.g., cars). These changes can include how strongly different brain areas respond to the objects of expertise or how different brain areas interact with each other in response to those objects. To do so, we train people to acquire expertise with novel objects and scan their brain before and after training. We also test individual with known brain lesions to better understand these neural changes. Funded by the ESRC.

Collaborators
Friederike Zimmermann, University of Louvain
Aliette Lochy, University of Louvain
Bruno Rossion, University of Louvain

X
 

Impact of attention on the neural mechanisms of adaptation
Adaptation is an important process in which the brain changes its responsiveness to the repetition of the same or similar stimulus. Our goal is to understand the neural mechanisms of adaptation and how attention may change how our brains adapt to stimulus repetition. We use a combination of psychophysics and brain imaging, and test humans and other animals with visual (faces) and auditory (voices) stimuli. Funded by the BBSRC.

Collaborators
Chris Petkov, Newcastle University
Yuki Kikuchi, Newcastle University
Nick Barraclough, York University

X
 

Shape, motion and colour information for face and object recognition
People can use different visual features alone or in combination to recognise people and objects in a complex and cluttered environment. We use psychophysics, eye tracking, and computational modelling to test how people attend to and use these features for perceiving, recognising, and interacting with people and objects. We also test recognition across different animal species, including bees, pigeons and humans.

Collaborators
Katja Mayer, University of Munster
Alinda Friedman, University of Alberta
Marcia Spetch, University of Alberta
Jim Tanaka, University of Victoria
Ian Thornton, University of Malta

   
  Neural correlates of face, body and object recognition
Brain networks for visual attention
We are interested in the networks for recognising faces, bodies and objects using brain imaging. Functional networks can be identified using analyses such as psychophysiological interactions or dynamic causal modelling. Structural networks can be identified using diffusion tensor imaging which allows us to reconstruct white-matter tracts between brain regions using tractography techniques.

Collaborators
Katja Mayer, University of Munster
Anthony Atkinson, Durham University
Johannes Schultz
   
X
X
X
X
X
X
difficult, difficult, lemon difficult
Simon Foster, In the Loop
X
X
X
Last updated ~ August 2017